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on top of a recessionary environment is a toxic mix. >> the ecb saying spanish bank deposits down 1.1% on the month in august, which means they're now the lowest level since april 2008. and we've got a prime minister there who has effectively said to the markets come out and short me because we're not going to go for a bailout unless webo costs go higher. and he's trying to delay aid until after the catalonia elections. and that seems like a pretty thin tight rope to walk. loan i. >> and we'll get the report on just how much money the banks need. it is suspected it will be in the 60 billion plus. but the elections on october 21st, that's rajoy's own province. and then you have the cat lo loaniloa loanian region think they're the richest region giving too much to the others. the rest of the region has seen a dramatic change. during the good times, they had revenue. from the developers, people buying properties, now that's all going and they're left from the legacy. from cat loan i can't to the canaries, you name it, all of these places, they're all struggling.alonia to the canari you
environment saying it's challenging and reported a drop in its first half net profit. it was really dragged down by some sluggish sales numbers. it's got a cost of one billion pounds. the company trying to fix its domestic operations, investing in stores, people and products. the online department has been a huge push. the contrast has been -- you can see the varying performances of these two stocks in the trading session today. its numberns coming in fairly well. this is the third biggest supermarket chain here in the uk. take a look at the spike in the airline. it's certainly making some strong inroads out there. raised its profit guidance. it's also reported a boost in strong demand from some of the european beach roots from london, so it's been using the flights to fly into some of those little nations. it seems as though the pursestrings for holiday travelers has certainly being loosened a little bit. let's take a look at what's playing out on debt markets today across the charts. you see prices are moving high. we're still seeing below the 1.5% level. the constant question mark surrou
where you can find opportunity. >> everybody's looking for yield in an environment where we can't find any. rick, what are you seeing there today? >> you had a great point. everybody's looking for yields, so everybody needs to take more risk. that's the plan. the problem is, when you take more risk to get more reward, you have more risk. you know, take the word austerity and throw it out. use the word reform. one guest just said central bankers are doing all the heavy lifting. because the heavy lifting for them is easy. print, print, print, print. the real hard part is the reform the politicians need to get these economies vibrant. it's not going to be easy. that's why it looks like it's gridlock. it looks like it's fighting. in the end, it's because there isn't one easy magic wand solution. >> sure, sure. you could call it reform, michelle. you could call it austerity. you can call it cup cakes. i don't know what you want to call t but it hurts. >> the difference matters, right? here's what we found in greece. they don't want to do reforms. they don't want to break the companies in co
of cisco, having the experience that you've had at yahoo! tell me how you see the environment changes and where specifically you would expect growth to happen in technology in the next five years. >> well, i think technology in general -- probably the biggest challenge is not so much the social interactions but everybody's talking so much about data. data is very, very hard to mine correctly. so i think you're going to see a push back towards a lot of enterprise apps that really figure out how it get information to the companies so they can actually be more personalized for the user, but easy to say, a lot to do. >> and really quick, on what you're seeing out there, how tough is europe right now for technology? what are you seeing in terms of the global slow down? >> well, europe continues to baffle us in general in technology. it looks like it's getting softer, not stronger. you know, companies that diversified over the past 20 years do make sure they had good portfolios in all the regions, you know, are taking a hit now with europe. i think it's broad based, so it shouldn't be a kno
with the fact that we're in, to put it lightly, a highly unusual climate and environment right now with long-term interest rates being held at 0% for quite some time. >> well, one of the ironies and one of the sad elements of glad path and target date strategies today is they are pushing people more and more heavily into bond at a time when bond yields with more negative. you're not making money, you're losing money by investing more and more in bonds. so we wind up becoming enablers of bad behavior in washington and supporters of that bad behavior by buying more and more of the bond when yields are negative. >> bob, have you a wonderful reputation and a great record built around the idea that you turn conventional wisdom inside out, whether it's fundamental indexing or this assault on the conventional thinking in target date funds. but i wonder what the real risk to the fund business is if these target date funds -- which certainly imply that you're going to have a set amount of money on a certain date. what if they don't work out and what should the assumptions be if i'm an investor on wha
to stimulate cargo. the cargo has to be there from the manufacturers and from the general economic environment. but next year, the car go industry might pick up a little bit. the conditions for cargo are still very bad now. but again, overall the industry of course is still more passenger than cargo. and it's been a bit of a double whammy this year because for the long call carriers operating out of asia, they're heavily exposed to markets like europe where there's been an impact. >> are we going get anymore meaningful consolidation? i don't see eus saying to america you should really allow for proper mergers between european and u.s. airlines. do you think that's ever going it to be allowed? >> there's still a lot of steps to be taken to allow that to happen. true global consolidation, a lot of countries still have policies that limit foreign investment in the airline sector. so we need to see a lot of changes in the regulatory environment to allow that to happen. in the meantime, we did see a lot of consolidation continue to happen within regions like latin america, like north america, like
and retail business are rising. and also in some lines of the industrial business. so the overall environment for the insurance industry is very good. your free float is about 20%. will you stop here for a while or will you raise money in the future? >> we'll raise money in the future, however, not for the next 24 months. we are sufficiently capitalized now after this ipo on for the next 24 months, but there will be further capital increases in the future. this is just our first step in to becoming a listed insurance company. >> all right. and just give us your view where we stand at the moment with the world economy. because it's interesting where you're looking at your operations. eurozone still in the grips of recession or low growth, weaker growth in asia. just give us your sense of how you view the world and how it transfers back into your business. >> i'm 100% sure that the euro will survive. the euro is instrumental for the future of europe. the emerging market particularly in brazil and mexico are very interesting growing markets for the future. and also the middle and eastern europea
it disappointing. now, i think paychex is a well-run business. while the company is facing a tough environment, the quarter wasn't terrible by any stretch of the imagination. it beat it by a penny on a 40 cents basis and 2% year over year. last time i thought that was the hugely important key metric. however, the growth year seems to be decelebrating. especially since that's why i'm thrilled to have marty, the chairman and ceo here to talk about the quarter. mr. mucy, welcome back to "mad money." >> good to be here, jim. >> i've got to oh tell you, i've been through these various downgrades and it's almost like they thought that the payroll numbers had dropped so we have 6.5 to 7% unemployment. the fact is we always thought it was this number that we cared so much about which was the actual 2% revenues number. it suddenly didn't matter. all the people looked at was you guys didn't capitalize on the gigantic increase on employment on the matter. >> we thought it was a good quarter. it met our expectations, client base and client retention all improving. we felt good. it was a good start to the
be a terrific buy especially in an environment where the price of gold keeps going higher. what is this company? it's sandstorm gold symbol sand. speculative canadian mine financing business. think of sandstorm as beinging a financer for gold miners. we're in an environment where mierns have a lot of trouble getting financing. lenders aren't lending them money. they need more capital. take advantage of this high gold price. that's where sandstorm comes in they will give a gold miner immediate money up front in exchange for the percentage of the future gold produced. in essence buying themselves a piece of the production stream. they also make a fixed ongoing payment for the gold they receive ooe down the road. that payment is incredibly low, usually around $500 an ounce. gold is worth about $1700 an ounce. why don't you think of sandstorm being a smaller version of a stock that blew my mind when they came on the show, franklin nevada. that's another company that invests in gold royalty streams who's ceo opened my eyes to this whole concept. since then the stock has risen 13% in three weeks. fra
business decisions being made as a result of the uncertainty in the macro environment. >> the dow up 10%. the s&p 500 up nearly 500. nasdaq up nearly 20%. the dax up 25. pretty nice gains. at the beginning of the year, you would have taken all of those for the year, right? >> certainly. the reason being, actually stocks and corporates are generally in this economic crisis that we're seeing around the western world are the safe haven. you don't want exposure to governments. you don't want exposure to consumers. the corporates can manage their cost base. they can move where the demand is much more freely than say consumers can and governments can. so at the moment, money's got to go somewhere and it's hard to get too bearish on equities, given the yields and actually how demand is holding up for these organizations. >> that's what you were talking about, where else that money might go. so look, for example, at corporate credit where we've seen such an inflow into high yield. we've seen high yield returning in the range of 17% this year. so if you look into next year when it already looks
what moody's does in this environment, where actually we're discussing whether there will be intervention on the ecb? >> first of all, i think it is very relevant because this would bring spain's rating down to junk levels, which is the lowest of all three rating agencies, so it's a pretty big deal. and then the ecb program can't be implemented until spain actually says they want help. so it depends what happens first. i think it's going to be a slippery slope. finally, we've got the budget coming up tomorrow. there are more painful cuts, it could mean more pain for spain and more pain for the euro. >> there's a lot of tifs in tha. >> you could also argue that all the central banks have been ineffective in generating momentum in the markets right now. so even if they're persistently buying, it's really about risk appetite and sentiment. i don't think there's enough there. central banks could come in and make another announcement, but i think having just made these unprecedented announcements, that that could lead to firefighting. >> what are you targeting? >> lo
. so there is -- it's a very skittish, very fragile environment. >> yeah. obviously, the q2 gdp numbers are old, a little dusty here, but they do not show any acceleration which is what we're trying to find clues to in the back half of the of the year. >> i think what happened is europe had a much bigger effect on business sentiment than many people thought. it's been dampening exports and capital spending which is what the durables reflect. as we moved through the summer and stabilized on europe, normally we might get some acceleration. the problem frou is you have the fiscal cliff and the election. people now have yet another excuse not to do anything. had europe not bled into the summer as long as it did, maybe you'd have gotten that spark in activity. but right now you just don't have it. >> are you taking a lot of solace in what housing's done, what confidence is doing? >> yeah, the housing numbers i think are great. that's one of the reasons the economy hasn't been strong to this point in the cycle. housing is keeping us from really stuttering on growth. we need more in housing, a
of the more mature companies. >> what matters is if you create an environment for people to invest in the united states. the last several administrations i went to washington if intel is going to build this next major manufacturing facility the net present value of the facility in a u.s. compared to a lower corporate tax environment is $ billion. it's a tough sell to be patriotic and have that facility in the u.s. cut the corporate tax rate down to a competitive level. i think technology will continue to advance. the problem is keeping the good ideas in the u.s. and create jobs. >> it can happen in spite of things or you can help or be sort of in the way? >> or you can facilitate for an economy which is growing. what we do with foreign graduate students, taxpayer money pays to educate them to get thai masters and ph.d.s and tech topics and our immigration policy says go home. it's a brilliant philosophy. >> you said the growth in intel will be abroad. whatever the tax policy is, i imagine you have to go abroad on manufacturing and engineering. you want to go to the customer. even i
are taking risks. >> oh, sure, in this environment, i mean, you know, we're watching liquidity like a hawk because there's great sense tomorrow morning it could go the other way, in effect you don't invest as much, you don't take as much risk. >> how would you counter the argument that businesspeople and the wealthy have had their way for the past 2030-years as they've increased their lead in terms of income disparity and gotten richer and richer, and you would have hoped that some of that would have trickled down, if it works you would have hoped the average person would have participated in the good times and haven't and you need a president that is going to come in for the powerless people that aren't able to set policy and pay to go do things and you need someone that will represent them in the future. how was is that pretty damned good? >> yes, sir. >> you can take this. thank you for writing it for me. >> i'll get you a job at "the new york times." the reality is as follows. the whole focus has been on how the quote, one percenters or ten percenters, how the top earners moved ahead o
producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> welcome back. we have weakness on wall street today. about 30 minutes left before the closing bell sounds. the dow jones industrial average down about 38 points in the home stretch. more from mary thompson. >> just about seven points above the lows of the day for the dow jones industrial average, pressured by europe. we want to highlight one group. you heard seema talking about some of the bounce back and the big tech names earlier today. the tech sector was the weakest performer among the ten we follow. energy right now has taken that slot. turning around in large part because we've seen a turn around in hewlett-packard. they've come off
in this environment. how do you do it when we see the fundamentals are not keeping up with some of this market performance? >> it's a real challenge. the private client was tremendously traumatized by the financial crisis and spooked by technology glitches and continuing scandals in the marketplace. they still don't trust that if they put their money in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, it's going to grow in value over time. we've been encouraging them in as many ways as we can to move out of cash, move out of bonds, which they perceive as safe but have their own risks, into at least a benchmark waiting in equities. the problem is all through this year you've had overhanging uncertainty in the marketplace. first, u.s. economic growth, china, european sovereign debt crisis. those have been replaced right now by, as you've mentioned, fiscal cliff and debt ceiling negotiations. the investor is confused about where to go, but those investors who stayed in cash missed this rally that we've had this year. they shouldn't make that mistake again. >> are you saying don't stay in cash? you want to get on thi
lockheed's f-35 program most at risk. goldman sachs says the current downsizing environment increases the potential for m & a activity. with the clock ticking down to fiscal armageddon, expect defense companies to send out layoffs after the holiday. that's your q-4 channel check for defense. i'm jane wells. >> all right. so let's dig deeper into which defense stocks could feel the biggest impacts if we go off the fiscal cliff. >> joining us is jeremy devaney. do you think we'll see those sequestration cuts in defense next year, $55 billion? >> good afternoon, bill. thanks for having me on. yes, we definitely think the fiscal cliff is coming, especially the sequestration cuts or the budget cuts for the defense department. right now the polarization up on the hill is not allowing for any movement in legislation to resolve that issue. >> all right. so let's talk about sort of breaking this down. first off, when are you expecting the defense companies to alert employees that their jobs will be cut? is that october 1st or november 2nd? what's your end date? >> sure. we're looking at novemb
quarter, given both the domestic and international environments, the uncertainty we've seen, the election is coming. we did well for the third quarter. >> all right. sure did. thank you so much, jackie. don't even think about touching that remote. we have a lot more ahead on this friday edition of the "closing bell." >>> mortgage rates hit rock bottom again, so why aren't home sales blowing through the roof? housing in the spotlight up next. >>> and later, she's actually not crazy. the subsidized program for the poor has mushroomed since 2008 due to possible abuse. we'll talk to congressman tim griffin who's proposing a bill to reign it in. >>> plus, what happens in france stays in san francisco? maria speaks with a mitt romney supporter and hp ceo carly fiorina. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...you see they all have h a deeper knowledgeresting in of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's i
's get straight to the markets and talk about investing in this environment. gentlemen, good see you. thank you so much for joining us. dan, let me kick this off with you. what do you think happened at end of the day today? seems this market has been trading on some worries last several sessions. yet, we did see some optimism at end of the day. >> absolutely. it's a case of perhaps, you know, still do not fight the fed. what we were watching specifically was apple. you mentioned it. we were looking for support on the stock at around 650. wouldn't you know it, it hit their intraday lows. they don't want to see that stock drop. the interesting thing with that is, you know, apple is a bell weather that's really driving the nasdaq 100, driving a lot of these larger cap benchmarks we follow. if you keep that buoyed, you're going to keep the markets buoyed going forward. >> that's a really good point. i guess, david, for those fund managers who have not owned apple, they're going to be playing catch up fourth quarter so their fund looks better by year end, right? >> it's possible. you have
to be a challenging environment. mandy, great point. china's deceleration is very important. it's very real. you're seeing that in commodity complex. i think that revenue line is going to be very, very important. that's probably going to come in soft. >> all right. we'll leave it there. thanks, everybody. appreciate your time tonight. we'll keep watching this market and the fundamentals around it. we look now where the big money is eyeing and whether or not foreign money is coming into the u.s. we have henry m henry mcveigh w. tell me what you're hearing. >> the clients with the long-term focus are the ones we traditionally work with. we see opportunities. we have a very big presence in asia. i was just over in hong kong and india. we're finding things to do on the consumer side. i would tell you, i do think the chinese economy in particular, the export economy, is structurally broken. i think that's a big change. i've been going to china since 1995. i think there's a fundamental shift in what's going on. we saw that in the caterpillar numbers. you saw that in the federal express numbers. some p
interest rate environment -- who isn't -- check out big pharma. which companies may be preparing to boost their dividends coming up. >>> as we head out, here's how the five biggest dividends in the dow jones industrial 30. our favorite, intel, up 1.68%. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. like in a special ops mission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal collateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeting stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. trade architect. td ameritrade's empowering web-based trading platform. trade commission-free for 60 days, and we'll throw in up to $600 when you open an account. governor of getting it done.
. there are a lot of places to make money in a near zero interest rate environment. >> the low interest rates which the federal reserve told us are going to be that way until 2015 are also hurting savers. >> they absolutely are. it creates inflation risk. yes, people are being penalized. the return they get, if they're investing their savings someplace safe, the return they're getting is not keeping pace with inflation. every year they're losing money. and so, of course, that creates incentives to go and invest in riskier assets. that's what we had with the crisis. we had very low interest rates then. not nearly as low as they are now. people were looking for return with subprime mortgages. it creates incentives which create significant risk for the system. i think the fed is proceeding with the best of intentions. i think the risks of what we're doing are tremendous and the benefits are incremental at best. >> it's been about the fed providing all the stimulus. what kind of fiscal policy would you like to see? >> the solutions are not hard. it's having the political will to do that. need to get en
a little risk on in the short term, but european markets underperforming the u.s. >> in this environment, i'm a reluctant supporter of kuwaequi. you look at what we have, where bond yields are, where credit has gone over the course of the last six, eight months, you have to end up saying equities are the best of a band bunch. >> an improvement in the pace of job let claim filings. so just how much momentum is the world's juggernaut economy carrying into the fourth quarter? drew mattes joins us in studio. thanks for coming by. what is your view on the u.s. economy, how much momentum really is there as we look into the fourth quarter and next year? >> you're looking at growth in the fourth quarter probably not going to breach 2%. we're just going to have to learn to live with that. and as much as the job rest claims numbers are good news, we still haven't seen the pick up in hiring. so until we see that, i don't think you can get that much momentum. sdl they 00 a discussion about stall speed. are we headed in to recession or do we expect to slug it out here? >> what we found is the volatility
mass-oriented environments where it's pegboard and they point you to aisle four, go find it yourself. we've done research that shows in certain categories, especially foundation, the consumer shop en masse, she spends more than when she buys in prestige where she buys in the store to the exact match foundation. the value proposition is around service which is why in this market, in north america, very high percentage of the total beauty business that's done in prestige like macy's because of that service proposition and a relatively low, absolute value differential in the price point. >> we continue to see companies go in and have difficulty in china. one company told us last week that western companies are going into china with western views about the chinese consumer and their loyalty and they're finding that that consumer passes them by in different ways. are there lessons you've already figured out on that front? >> we've been doing business in asia for 30, 40 years. and we first started in japan in the early '70s, then expanded into korea and hong kong. we've been in china doing
that sports a yield, exactly the kind of dividend stock you want in this low interest rate environment. it's rallied since the beginning of the year, but lately it's pulled back three points. it could be giving you a good entry point here. first though, before making any decisions let's take a closer look with the chairman and co-ceo of prologis. brand new guest, brand new name. welcome to "mad money." >> nice to meet you. >> first, you just have the biggest building portfolio i've ever seen. it's global, right? just giant. >> it is pretty big and it's pretty good, which is more important, right? >> the reason i asked, normally i like to have real estate investor guys on because they know the tenor of the united states but you have huge exposure. in your most recent conference call you actually talk about -- what it's like in japan, china, brazil, canada. mexico. and these are doing very well. >> they are indeed. we're in 21 countries and with the exception of a few countries in europe, the rest of the world is actually doing pretty well. including some of the places in europe and northern
our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts, more events, more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with the citi card. [ crowd cheering, mouse clicks ] you.piano ]nnouncer ] get more access with the citi card. we know you. we know you're not always on top of it. and how could you be? that often you just want... quiet. we know all that life demands from you. and how it's almost impossible for
would have the federal government take advantage of the low interest rate environment and issue $500 million in 30-year bonds to fix the nation's infrastructure. fifth, i would slap tariffs on goods made by countries. that would stop the endless parade of jobs migrating from our country to other countries. they have a ridiculous competitive advantage over us. six, i would insist there be a course in high school called money where kids could learn what money is, how to save, how to invest. people need education about the stock market. perhaps to find their own therapeutics. seventh, i would appoint a steven jobs memorial competitiveness czar to figure out how our businesses could be made more speft and find out what they need. not government handouts but trying to get educated engineers to help these companies. i would reappoint ben bernanke as chairman of the federal reserve. if it weren't for him, he would never have gotten out of the great depression to begin with. without bernanke, we have nationalized the banks and be stuck with unemployment over 10%. here's the bottom line. nobo
is discourage the move toward electric cars by trying to alleviate our concerns about the environment. they showed us their new $4 million experimental combustion engine, which they hope will increase gas mileage while it lowers co2 emissions. >> what we want to see is that there is an emphasis on also making this oil greener and making the fossil fuels in general greener, because they're gonna be with us for the long haul. >> let me be blunt, okay? and ask you to be candid. is it aramco's hope to prevent a switch away from oil? somebody said the country is the oil business. i mean, you absolutely need to do this for your own survival. >> and what's wrong with that? >> well, i didn't say anything was wrong with it, but it's a fact. you'd admit it's a fact. >> yeah, we admit a fact that, yes, this is--we depend on the oil industry. we want it to help us, you know, to develop our economy and to develop the economy of the world. so what is good for the well-being of saudi arabia should be good for the well-being of the world too. so there's nothing wrong with that. >> and so what do you
-home pay. the best way to do that in this environment is to lower marginal tax rates for the middle class. don't go back on your pledge, mr. romney. i'm larry kudlow. we'll be back tomorrow. i'm bara ck o bama and i approve i'm bara this message. ck o romney: "it's time to stand up to the cheaters" vo: tough on china? not mitt romney. when a flood of chinese tires threatened a thousand american jobs... it was president obama who stood up to china and protected american workers. mitt romney attacked obama's decision... said standing up to china was "bad for the nation and our workers." how can mitt romney take on the cheaters... when he's taking their side? the silverado's powertrain warranty is 40,000 miles more than ford. and this workhorse gives you the power of a v8 with the highway fuel economy of a v6. incredible! right? an amazing test drive. i agree. [ male announcer ] it's chevy truck month. now during chevy truck month, get 0% apr financing for 60 months or trade up to get the 2012 chevy silverado all-star edition with a total value of $8,000. hurry in before they're all gone!
growth drags down the u.s. and sends us into a slower growth environment or even recession. so i think we want to look at both of those possibilities. i would have wanted to see more data on that and see how that's unfolding before we took action. >> i'm really glad you brought up the fiscal deal. we've been talking about this so much on this program, this fiscal cliff. many economists expecting we'll dip back into a recession in 2013 buecause we'll go over the fiscal cliff. obviously no deal before the election. it's a 2013 affair. is that where you stand with the economy, dip back into a recession given where we are with this fiscal cliff? >> well, the cbo's estimates seem to suggest that. if it was just a no deal all around, gdp would decline in the first part of next year. i continue to think that despite all the brinksmanship, there will eventually be some kind of deal. obviously it won't be what everybody wants. it will have to be some kind of compromise. it might be hard to see it right now. but i think there will be some kind of deal. what's bad for the u.s. economy is that our po
that has been able to thrive in all sorts of economic environments. very tough to do in an inno investigation, economy, bill, and where technology moves so fast. as so many of us are witnessing with oracle and its innovation. we have 35 minutes before "the closing bell" sounds. market is higher but well off the highs of the day. >>> hasn't just been stocks making high today. gold hit a nearly one-year high earlier this session, despite beginning what is historically the worst month for the precious metal. will this october buck that trend? we'll look at that coming up. >>> then later on, congress may be on break, yet again, but at least somebody is working on our debt problem. and they claim their solution cuts more than hitting the fiscal cliff would. would be a lot less painful. how's that possible? they're here to explain. stay with us on this. back in a moment. [ male announcer ] the 2013 smart comes with 8 airbags, a crash management system and the world's only tridion safety cell which can withstand over three and a half tons. small in size. big on safety. governor of gett
equity firms, so where is it seeing investment opportunities in this uncertain environment right now? kkr's head of global mac roand asset. accolade overdrive. zagat just gave hertz its top rating in 15 categories, including best overall car rental. so elevate your next car rental experience with the best. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. if we want to improve our schools... ...what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ...nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back. just keeps getting worse for hewlett packard. seema mody, how bad now? >> we're continuing to watch the big moves in hewlett packard. that's the big tech lagger today. just looking at chart, bill, the stock just broke $15 a share. it's down now 50% from its 2012 intraday high it hit back in february. the stock down about 13% in today's trade. back to you. >> al
to talk about the idea that government should be smaller and get out of the way. and an environment that is favorable for business is actually an environment where business will create jobs. how that's going to go over? >> it won't go over well, he hasn't had a real plan so far. these are about real people's lives. he's got a tougher job i think than the president tonight. because most people because of his comments whether he realizes it or not, he's lived a privileged life. and he doesn't understand common workers, what we go through every day. so he's got a tough job to make people let them know that he does understand what they go through. if he can do that, he'll have a good night. if he can't, i don't think the zingers are going to matter. because big problems require big solutions not bumper sticker answers. >> of course we know the relationship between white house and labor has not always been rosy over the last four years. is there something the president also needs to say to impress you? >> again, it's not what he says to me but what really american workers need. and that'
over the tax environment for 2013." one piece of data. i don't know what kind of score you get on the vindicated doves here. but you can see the average coming down. the actual numbers before averaging them, 385 down to 359. get something improvement in jobs numbers together with the consumer snichlt jobs component was not too bad. we'll have to watch this closely. but right now we're taulg this vindicated doves and maybe there's another game out there, angry hawks but michelle has a much easier time of making this stretch of a metaphor to an app. all you. >> from vindicated doves, right? hi, simon. >> yes. let's get on with the bad piggies. i can't wait, michelle. not offensive to europeans at all. not offensive at all. you talk about the little piggies in southern europe. you go ahead with it. >> they went wee, wee, wee -- >> the new game is called bad piggies. this is an acronym used on wall street for portugal, ireland, italy, greece, and pain spain. piigs. two is there. let's give you the state of where they are right now. and the best way we thought was their ten-year yie
. >> sure. >> so as you look forward, how do you invest in an environment that looks like we're going to have easy money for a long time? you've kind of changed the typical asset allocation most people go to. >> oh, yeah, it's a crazy world. at oppenheimer we're talking about the new 60/40. people's portfolios are perfectly positioned for the past. they're positioned for 2008. we're still seeing 30 billion a quarter flowing into core bond funds, which are yielding negative in real terms, below inflation. that's madness from our point of view. investors have to understand that the notion of what is safe and what is risky has to be adjusted a little bit. safe doesn't mean securities that have a lot of interest rate risk and no yield. that is not what safety means to us today. again, given the plentiful liquidity and what we think is a moderate global recovery, we think it's safe to move out into more credit-oriented investments, more higher income investments. >> high yield corporate? >> high yield continues to look good in our view. it's come that lot but far from how tight it can get.
of qe in that environment is going to be sufficiently poor, that the fed will step away. >> we're getting these weird cross currents. i'm glad you're here to ask about it. when the fed did it, we thought wow, things are worse than we thought. consumer confidence seems to be improving. the market was doing better. there's a lot of things that look like -- what were you talking about? what was so bad that you saw in this economy? but again, the transportation average is now down for the year. china looks worse than it was. are we entering a -- are we doing okay and accelerating in terms of growth, or are we slowing down again? >> i think there's probably three things that feed into it. first the transition mechanism wasn't working. people were instead of going out and buying risk assets and investigating companies, they were buying bonds in anticipation of the fed buying so. the operation twist was flattening the yield curve and trap iping liquidity there. i think the fact fact was constantly giving fixed numbers and fixed dates gives the market something to focus on when it ends
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it in this environment. i'd like to see us do whatever we're going to do -- >> the world's gotten a lot more dang ruerous in the last month. >> it is but we're coming out two of wars thate expen expensive, so i think you have to play with the whole deck of cards. in the long run we ought to change our tax system dramatically. i don't think we can do that in the short run. in the long run i'd love to see us go to encouraging savings and investment, some type of consumption tax at the income tax level. >> is anyone going into politics with a full deck of cards? >> well, increasingly no. >> marty, i want to just speak to one issue which is globalization in the whole tax debate during the commercial break, joe and i were talking about revenues, percentage of gdp and given the economic uncertainty and the economic headwinds we've had over the past three or four years but how much, when you think about the little revenue that we're bringing or a lot less revenue we're bringing in, how much of that is a function of just straight up the economy and how much of that is globalization? >> oh, it's not globalization
, basically small businesses are just not growing in this environment and big businesses are chasing profits abroad. so the government is just not getting the tax take on that front. in the asset classes, you can see some of the levels not that good at the moment. bundes still attracting a lot of attention. we've been waiting on spain to fishlgly l-- officially ask fo that aid. nonetheless, we're not seeing too much pressure on the periphery, 5.75%. let me send it back to you. >> thank you very much. the first presidential debate. john harwood is on the ground in denver. he joins us with the latest nbc news "wall street journal" poll. it looks like things are starting to even out at least a little. is this the bounce that president obama got after the democratic convention coming back down? >> well, i think it's the bounce from the convention and the surge that he got on top of the convention with that 47% video, so there is some good news for romney. not only our national poll, but also in the swing state polls that we do with "the wall street journal" and maris college. take a look at the
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